Augustus. 27 BC-AD 14. Iron dies for Æ Dupondius or As.- Joe Geranio

Augustus. 27 BC-AD 14. Iron dies for Æ Dupondius or As. Dimensions of obverse die: die face 31 mm in diameter and die shank 37 mm. Weight: 148.40 grams. Bronze face of cast impression of reverse of dupondius (RIC I 381) or as (RIC I 382) for the moneyer Cn. Piso Cn. f. mounted to iron shank. Dimensions of reverse die: die face 30 mm in diameter; die shank 39 mm at the face, tapering to 30 mm in diameter at mid point and widening to 42 mm at the base. Weight: 320.20 grams. Bronze face of cast impression of reverse of dupondius (RIC I 381) or as (RIC I 382) for the moneyer Cn. Piso Cn. f. mounted to iron shank. Cf. N. Lupu, “Aspekte des Münzumlaufs im vorrömischen Dakien,” JNG XVII

A Rare Set of Iron Dies for a Dupondius or As of Augustus (27 B.C.E.-14 C.E.), Excessively Rare with Both Obverse and Reverse Dies Preserved

(1967), pl. 7; cf. C.C. Vermeule, “Some notes on ancient dies and coining methods,” NumCirc LXII.2 (February 1954), pp. 53-4; cf. W. Malkmus, “Addenda to Vermeule’s catalog of ancient coin dies: Part 1,” SAN XVII.4 (September 1989) -. VF for type, die faces well-preserved with green and light olive patina, worn from striking. Extremely rare set with both obverse and reverse die .

Based on the dies themselves, it is impossible to tell whether they were used to strike dupondii or asses, since both issues of this moneyer were of the same type. This remarkable set of dies was undoubtedly employed to strike local coinage in one of the Balkan provinces along the Danube frontier.  cng

Joe Geranio

Julio Claudian Iconographic Association

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The Domus Transitoria of Nero- Joe Geranio

 

House Painting Fragment fron Emperor Nero's Domus Transitoria

House Painting Fragment fron Emperor Nero's Domus Transitoria

These fresco’ are from the first palace of Nero or the “Domus Transitoria”, not the “Domus Aurea- Nero’s Golden House”. Rare and wonderful are these paintings.

Domus Transitoria: * a palace erected by Nero qua Palatium et Maecenatis hortos continuaverat (Tac. Ann. XV.39; cf. Suet. Nero 3: domum a Palatio Esquilias usque fecit quam primo transitoriam, mox incendio absumptam restitutamque auream nominavit). Its object was to connect with the Palatine, not merely the Horti Maecenatis (q.v.) but other estates (Horti Lamiani, Lolliani, etc.) which in one way or another had come into the possession of the imperial house. It was destroyed by the fire of 64 A.D. and replaced by the domus Aurea. No remains of it were believed to exist, until the excavations made by Boni under the southern portion of the state apartments of the domus Augustana (Flavia) led to the rediscovery of the remains of a sumptuous and beautifully decorated palace in two stories. By some it is attributed to the Domus Q. Lutatii Catuli (q.v.), but this will not agree with the date of the construction. Others assign it to Claudius, owing to the existence of a quarry mark bearing his name on a piece of cornice found there; but it is a good deal more likely that we have to deal with the remains of a part of the domus Transitoria (the attribution to the original house of Augustus (HJ 90) will not hold, as the remains are obviously of a later date); see Mem. Am. Acad. V.116, 121, 122.

To the lower floor belongs a sunk garden; one wall of it is occupied by a magnificent nymphaeum, once decorated with polychrome marbles, but terribly damaged in the excavations made by the Farnese in 1721 sqq. (Mitt. 1894, 22‑26; LR 163; PBS VII. p48, No. 100, where the references to Breval’s Remarks should read Ser. I (1726) ii.298; Ser. II (1738) i.84 sqq.; Kirkhall’s coloured engravings — copies at Eton, Bn. 13, 51‑54). In the centre were two pavilions with p195small columns, and between them garden beds, with vertical walls of curved slabs of marble, as in the ‘Maison des Jardinières’ at Timgad (Ill. 24). The wall opposite the nymphaeum is decorated with niches. On the south-west is a room with extremely beautiful paintings — small scenes from the Homeric cycle, within a framework in which blue and gold are predominant. What little remains of the polychrome marble pavement and wall facing shows extreme delicacy and beauty (YW 1912, 10‑11; 1913, 22; BA 1914, Cr 73). The irregular curving concrete foundations which cut through the whole of this part of the building belong to the domus Aurea, as they are certainly posterior to the fire of Nero and equally certainly anterior to Domitian.

Two rooms to the north-east, wrongly known as the baths of Livia (HJ 90, n117), have been accessible since 1721; and their ceilings have been frequently drawn (PBS VII. p33, n24 (cf. Egger, Krit. Verzeichn. d. Handzeichn. in Wien, n114); ib. p. 60, n14, is there wrongly identified with the ceiling of the second room, which is, however, represented by Ronczewski, Gewölbeschmuck, p29, fig. 16, and by Parker, photo 2227). Fine coloured drawings of both exist in the breakfast-room of the Soane Museum in Lincoln’s Inn Fields in London.1

Beyond these rooms is a very large latrine, which has been wrongly thought to be the machinery chamber of a hydraulic lift, which would, it is supposed, have worked in a shaft over 120 feet deep found not far off (JRS 1913, 251). The dining-room with a revolving ceiling, which Boni supposed to have been worked by the same machinery, was in the domus Aurea (Suet. Nero, 31).

From each end of the nymphaeum a flight of marble stairs ascended to the upper floor. Under the later triclinium only the bed of the pavement is left; but to the south-west and north-east its white marble slabs can be seen, some three or four feet below the level of Domitian, who reconstructed this part of the palace with only one story, abolishing the lower floor entirely; while under his nymphaeum on the north-west may be seen a remarkably fine pavement of •opus sectile, which when found showed clear and abundant traces of damage by fire. Close to it is a room which once contained a series of fountains, the water from which ran down to the nymphaeum below.

The piscina under the basilica of the Flavian palace is attributed to Nero by Boni (JRS 1913, 246), who wrongly refers Suet. cit. to the Palatine. See Domus Aurea, p166, and Domus Augustiana, p161. Cf. ZA 206‑208.

Other remains belonging to the domus Transitoria have been found near the junction of the Nova via with the clivus Palatinus (AJA 1923, 402); for remains under the platform of the temple of Venus and Rome, see LR 197, 198; Mitt. 1892, 289, 291; Mem. Am. Acad. V.121, 122.
The palace, named Domus Transitoria, was an architectural masterpiece which stretched from the Palatine, where Nero first lived with his grand-uncle and adoptive father Claudius and his mother Agrippina, to the gardens of Maecenas on the Esquiline.

The residence was grandiose, but it did not last long. Built around 60 A.D., it was ruined in the Great Fire four years later and was replaced by the Domus Aurea, one of the most opulent palatial complexes ever constructed.

news.discovery.com/history/nero-palace-recons tructed-virt…

Joe Geranio
Julio Claudian Iconographic Association

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The Portrait of Caligula from The Getty Villa- Joe Geranio

Getty Caligula Head - photo Joe Geranio

Getty Caligula Head - photo Joe Geranio

Getty Caligula Head - photo Joe Geranio

Getty Caligula Head - photo Joe Geranio

 

Unknown
Roman, Asia Minor, about A.D. 40
Marble
16 15/16 in.
72.AA.155

    
 
 
The Roman emperor Gaius, more commonly known by his nickname Caligula, ruled from A.D. 37 to 41 and was extremely unpopular. In fact, after he was murdered, almost all portraits of him were destroyed.

The Romans had a long tradition of portraiture, but portraits of emperors had a specific propaganda function beyond that of ordinary portraits. The actual appearance of the individual was combined with the political message that the portrait was meant to convey. Portraits of Caligula show a young man with a high forehead, small mouth, and thin lips. He is identifiable as an individual, yet his hairstyle copies that of the emperor Augustus, making a deliberate allusion to his dynastic connection and his right to rule.

The depiction of the emperor in these official portraits bears no resemblance to the unpleasant descriptions of Caligula provided by Roman writers such as Suetonius:

Height: tall — Complexion: pallid — Body: hairy and badly built — Neck: thin — Legs: spindling — Eyes: sunken — Temples: hollow — Forehead: broad and forbidding — Scalp: almost hairless, especially on top. Because of his baldness and hairiness he announced that it was a capital offense either for anyone to look down on him as he passed or to mention goats in any context.

 
If you are interested in Julio Claudian Iconography and portrait study you may enjoy these two links:

Julio Claudian Iconographic Association- Joe Geranio- Administrator at :  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/julioclaudian/

This is such a wonderful portrait that the Getty has of Gaius Caligula, it is from Asia Minor and is of very high quality.  I feel it best represents Caligula from the coin portraits we have of him.  I live in California and the Getty Villa is the only worthwhile Roman museum in the state and it is FREE!  Free parking and free entrance, all you have to do is go to their website and sign up.  I want to thank the Getty Villa museum for Keeping Ancient Greece and Rome alive.

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Portrait of Caligula and My Study of Portrait 24 Years Later- Joe Geranio

Caligula Getty Head and Joe Geranio

Caligula Getty Head and Joe Geranio

Caligula and Joe Geranio from the Getty Villa

Joe counting hair curls, pincers, etc………. from profile. The Gettty Caligulan head is fantastic for showing agreement on Caligula’ Vesta aes (bronze coins). See example below. Remember; these portraits are found without inscribed statue bases if that was the case and numismatics are the key for helping ID these wonderful Julio Claudian portraits.

For more on this portrait see: F. Johansen, ” The Sculpted Portraits of Caligula,” Ancient Portraits in the J. Paul Getty Museum, …
Johansen 1987, p. 97. Probably made shortly after Caligula’s accession, this head I have seen personally at the J. Paul Getty Museum. A most impressive head from Asia Minor. See also (JWAG) “A Pre-Principate Portrait of Gaius (Caligula?) by John Pollini 1982, p. 6. See: D. Boschung, “Die Bildnisse des Caligula”, Gebuder-Mann, (1989)

Here I am with the portrait 24 years earlier-  http://www.flickr.com/photos/julio-claudians/2488609032/in/photostream/

Unknown – Caligula Portrait
Roman, Asia Minor, about A.D. 40
Marble
16 15/16 in.
72.AA.155
The Roman emperor Gaius, more commonly known by his nickname Caligula, ruled from A.D. 37 to 41 and was extremely unpopular. In fact, after he was murdered, almost all portraits of him were destroyed.

The Romans had a long tradition of portraiture, but portraits of emperors had a specific propaganda function beyond that of ordinary portraits. The actual appearance of the individual was combined with the political message that the portrait was meant to convey. Portraits of Caligula show a young man with a high forehead, small mouth, and thin lips. He is identifiable as an individual, yet his hairstyle copies that of the emperor Augustus, making a deliberate allusion to his dynastic connection and his right to rule.

The depiction of the emperor in these official portraits bears no resemblance to the unpleasant descriptions of Caligula provided by Roman writers such as Suetonius:

Height: tall — Complexion: pallid — Body: hairy and badly built — Neck: thin — Legs: spindling — Eyes: sunken — Temples: hollow — Forehead: broad and forbidding — Scalp: almost hairless, especially on top. Because of his baldness and hairiness he announced that it was a capital offense either for anyone to look down on him as he passed or to mention goats in any context.
If you are interested in Julio Claudian Iconography and portrait study you may enjoy these two links:

Julio Claudian Iconographic Association- Joe Geranio- Administrator at groups.yahoo.com/group/julioclaudian/

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Two Small Bronze Globe Portraits of Gaius Caligula- Caput Mundi- Joe Geranio

Caligula on Globe- Brooklyn Museum

Caligula on Globe- Brooklyn MuseumCaligula on Globe- Brooklyn Museum

The top portrait states it is from the 2nd century, which I whatever that is worth is incorrect, it has all the attributes of an early 1st century bronze portrait?  Here is some more information on the aboce Caligulan portrait:

Portrait Bust of Emperor Caligula

Culture: Roman

  • Medium: Bronze
  • Dates: ca. 2nd century C.E.
  • Period: Imperial Period
  • Dimensions: 5 5/8 in. (14.3 cm)
  • Collections: Egyptian, Classical, Ancient Near Eastern Art
  • Museum Location: This item is not on view
  • Accession Number: 21.479.12
  • Credit Line: Bequest of William H. Herriman
  • Rights Statement: Creative Commons-BY-NC
  • Thanks to the Brroklyn Museum for the use of this CC for educational use only photos.

  • Caption: Roman. Portrait Bust of Emperor Caligula, ca. 2nd century C.E. Bronze, 5 5/8 in. (14.3 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Bequest of William H. Herriman, 21.479.12. Creative Commons-BY-NC

  • Image: front, 21.479.12_front_PS2.jpg. Brooklyn Museum photograph, 2006
    Roman. Portrait Bust of Emperor Caligula, ca. 2nd century C.E. Bronze, 5 5/8 in. (14.3 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Bequest of William H. Herriman, 21.479.12. Creative Commons-BY-NC (Photo: Brooklyn Museum, 21.479.12_front_PS2.jpg)
  •    
     
    The bottom portrait here is from Colschester of Gaius Caligula and is very beautiful and ornate.  The globe on each of these portraits represents , in my opinion Caput Mundi or ruler of the Roman world.  Citizens of Rome and the provinces would have these smaller size portraits of the princeps of the time, but so would the soldiers, who at first loved “little boots” and would do anything to protect him.  After his murder and I am sure before the military grew tiresome of his insults and the Praetorian guard assasinated him near the Palatine hill.  Relative to his short reign, a few portraits similiar in size were thrown into the Tiber river; which was a huge insult for any Roman princeps.       

     

    Small Bronze Portrait of Gaius Caligula- Colchester

    Small Bronze Portrait of Gaius Caligula- Colchester

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